Tuesday, July 01, 2014

Hobby Lobby Decision Highlights Parties’ Divide

By JEREMY W. PETERS and MICHAEL D. SHEAR, NYT
JUNE 30, 2014

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court’s ruling on Monday that the government cannot force certain employers to pay for birth control was more than a rebuke to President Obama. It was vindication of the conservative movement’s efforts to chip away at laws it finds objectionable by raising questions of freedom of expression.

The decision — like several recent rulings from the justices and lower courts involving prayer at town meetings and protests outside abortion clinics — carved out a significant, albeit narrow, legal exception in the context of a broader cultural fight that social conservatives have been unable to win outright.

The ruling comes as social conservatives have suffered setbacks on another high-profile social issue, same-sex marriage, and leaders predicted Monday’s decision would infuse Republicans with energy as they fight to take control of the Senate this year and reclaim the White House in 2016.

“The court has made clear today that the Obama administration’s assault on religious freedom in this case went too far,” said Gov. Bobby Jindal of Louisiana, one of several conservative Republicans weighing a White House run. “But this assault will not stop in our courts, in our schools and in the halls of power.”

(More here.)

1 Comments:

Blogger Tom Koch said...

One party believes that an individual should not have to give up their religious beliefs just because they own a corporation and the other party believes that people should be forced to go against their religious convictions just so a woman can end the life of her unborn child.

7:48 PM  

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